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JG Ballard - The Villages

hutch0
Date: 2009-04-19 19:13
Subject: JG Ballard
Security: Public
Location:home
Mood:sadsad
Music:sky news
The news has just been released that JG Ballard died this morning. It was no secret that he was ill and that he wasn't going to get better, but it's still very sad news. A giant has passed.
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 Communicator: blake
User: communicator
Date: 2009-04-19 18:57 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:blake
oh, that is sad news. your icon is very expressive
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User: sarcobatus
Date: 2009-04-19 19:39 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Raven
I heard. Very sad news indeed. This is the passing of an era.
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rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2009-04-26 16:35 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
He wrote one of my favourite short stories: The Assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy Considered as a Downhill Motor Race.
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hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2009-05-02 23:30 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I was enormously affected by the early `disaster' novels like The Drowned World and The Wind From Nowhere. I got into him and Keith Roberts at around the same time, and they were a revelation to me. Up till then I'd been reading Niven and Asimov and Heinlein and EE `Doc' Smith, and I hadn't thought that English people could write this kind of thing, in an English idiom. Roberts was - and continues to be - a much bigger influence on me than Ballard, but he did help change the way I thought about science fiction and its possibilities. I think he's one of those writers, like Chris Priest, whose work has enormous importance beyond the genre.
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rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2009-05-03 01:24 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Oddly enough, the one and only Roberts story I've read, Manscarer, is found within the same book on my bookshelf as Ballard's TAoJFKCaaDMR (no way am I writing the full title out again!).

Manscarer is an odd story, and I had to read it a few times to get my head around it. It grew on me with each reading.

It's a stonking anthology, it has to be said, also having stories by Aldiss, Laumer, Silverberg, Vonnegut, Disch, Zelazny, Moorcock, Pohl and P.K. Dick. A great deal of awesome packed into one small book.
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hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2009-05-03 01:38 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
What you need to do is get a hold of Roberts's novel Pavane and his collection Machines And Men, which pretty much says everything. Manscarer is good, but it's not typical.
What are the Laumer and Zelazny stories?
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rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2009-05-03 01:49 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
As it turns out, thanks to the wonders of the interwibble, I can point you to a full listing of the stories:

http://www.eclipse.co.uk/sweetdespise/moorcock/bib/antholog/dec1960.html
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hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2009-05-03 21:34 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Good lord. You know, I've never heard of half of these stories. `Hawksbill Station' and `The Heat Death Of The Universe' and the Ballard I know, but I never heard of `Devil Car' before, and I thought I'd read pretty much all of Zelazny's short stories.
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rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2009-05-04 02:34 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I've a confession to make. Devil Car is the only Zelazny story I *have* read.

In fact, for many of the authors who appear in this collection, I've only read that one example of their work. For a couple more, I've only read maybe one or two of their other stories. The only real exceptions, of whom I can say I've read several of their works are Moorcock, Aldiss and P.K. Dick.
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hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2009-05-06 22:34 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Ooh, Zelazny's brilliant. The short stories and novellas in particular. He was a big influence on me, too.
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rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2009-05-07 08:30 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
You're in good company then, as I've read that George R. R. Martin and Neil Gaiman count him as a big influence on them too.

By the way, I discovered that Devil Car is available to be read online:

http://lib.ru/ZELQZNY/devilcar.txt
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hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2009-05-08 22:44 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I haven't read a lot of Martin - although I think `Sandkings' is one of the best stories ever written. And I haven't read a lot of Gaiman either - although I loved American Gods with a passion. Thanks for the link; I'll sit and give that a read when I get time.
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rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2009-05-07 08:45 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
In the course of discovering that Devil Car exists online, I also found that it was part of a trilogy of sorts. The other two stories are Auto-de-Fé and Last of the Wild Ones.

All three revolve around the concept of artificially intelligent cars, some of whom kill their drivers and turn feral.
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hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2009-05-08 22:54 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
`Auto da Fe' was written for the original Dangerous Visions anthology, I think, which is where I read it first. `Last Of The Wild Ones' is another one I don't know, but now I think about it, Zelazny did seem to have a thing about cars.
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