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hizonner - The Villages

hutch0
Date: 2008-05-03 00:07
Subject: hizonner
Security: Public
Location:the utility room in the sky
Mood:calmcalm
Music:david sylvian
The BBC are reporting that we have a new Mayor. Combined with the bloodbath that was the local council elections, today has been a very bad day for Gordon. But a worse one for Ken.
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RealThog: Jim's bear pic
User: realthog
Date: 2008-05-02 23:19 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Jim's bear pic

"But a worse one for Ken."

And an even worse one for London . . .
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hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-05-02 23:35 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
We'll see. From my point of view Boris, like Ken, gets a honeymoon of about six months. After that, the gloves come off. Boris gave a proper acceptance speech that was so much at odds with Have I Got News For You Boris that he was almost unrecognisable. We'll see.
I'll make a comment in Ken's defence, which I've not been inclined to do recently. Whatever his faults - and they were many-fold and may yet involve police investigations - he put the office of London Mayor on the map, both nationally and internationally. He made sure it wasn't just an internal political appointment. And for that he has to be commended.
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hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-05-02 23:43 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
And he must also be commended for the way he behaved in the wake of the 7/7 bombings. He spoke for us all on that day, and he played a not inconsiderable part in the way Londoners dealt with the atrocity. Ken played a statesman's role, and he played it without fault. 'Nuff respect.
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RealThog: Jim's bear pic
User: realthog
Date: 2008-05-02 23:48 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Jim's bear pic

What about Johnson's racism? Is that not concerning in an ethnically mixed city?
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hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-05-02 23:57 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Which racism are you referring to? A lot of what he's said really has been misquoted. Srsly.
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RealThog
User: realthog
Date: 2008-05-03 00:02 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

I was thinking of the merry quips about piccanninnies (sp?).
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calcinations
User: calcinations
Date: 2008-05-04 16:40 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Here's a silly question- why do people seem desperate to vote conservative? Sure, the reasons they give for not voting labour are fairly obvious- they don't care about us, do nthing for us and have generally fouled things up. But it can't possibly be any better under the Conservatives, just a bit different in colour or a different order of words or something.
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hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-05-04 23:03 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
It's not so much that people want to vote Conservative; I think it's more that they want to register a protest against the government, and voting Conservative does that more effectively than voting Lib-Dem. But it also marks a new point in the rehabilitation of the Conservatives. Someone on election night said that the Conservatives have now become legitimised enough to be a vehicle of protest, but not enough to become the party of government. Which I think is a fair point. But it means they're making progress, and that means they need watching now.
And really, under Blair New Labour was pretty much indistinguishable from a Tory government. It certainly wasn't a Labour government as I grew up understanding them.
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RealThog: Jim's bear pic
User: realthog
Date: 2008-05-04 23:24 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Jim's bear pic

"And really, under Blair New Labour was pretty much indistinguishable from a Tory government. It certainly wasn't a Labour government as I grew up understanding them."

Too fuckin' right!

Alas.

I remember the morning after the election when the Tories finally got booted, and how the very air smelled cleaner; even one or two Tory friends remarked upon this.

And then there was Blair.

Trouble is, I think a lot of the UK public's adoration for Yer Tone was due to the fact his good pal Rupe thought he'd deliver lots of corporation-friendly policies. Come along yer Gordon, who has different ideas, and the UK public suddenly veers towards the Tories. Any connection?

Myself, I spent decades supporting Labour and even stood under the Labour banner for Westminster City Council. After a few years under Blair's PM-ship I'd have voted Lib-Dem, had that been an ethical possibility (I'm not sure about the ethics of voting in a country you no longer live in). Now I'd vote Lab again.
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hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-05-04 23:59 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Really? I never knew you stood for office. Good on you. How'd you do?
I remember my father telling me he had a lot of time for the Tory candidate in the area I grew up in. And you'll have to keep in mind that this was a pit village in northeast Derbyshire, just a hop and a skip from Sheffield. My father used to say the Tory candidate - and all the time I was growing up it was the same bloke - didn't stand a snowball's chance in hell of being elected. But he never gave up. My father - whose politics were kind of complicated (I once heard him say Mosley had some good ideas) and never, to my knowledge, ever voted - admired that. And he despised the local Labour candidate. He said he'd once seen him brawling in the street. My father never forgot stuff like that.
But my point, before I launched off down Memory Lane, was that New Labour had more in common with our local Tory candidate than the Labour one. They would have looked down on the Labour candidate. And a lot of men like him - far better men - were left by the wayside when Tony began The Project. And I can't forgive New Labour for that.
Back in '97 I had a friend who worked in the Civil Service in A Government Department. She was a staunch Labour supporter, but she never had anything but good things to say about the Tory ministers she worked under in the dying days of the Major years. She adored Ann Widdicombe, and she liked Portillo a lot - as I did when I met him. But she campaigned very energetically for Labour in the '97 election, and when I saw her a few months after Labour took power I was expecting her to be jubilant. Not a bit of it. She said the new Labour people she was working under were all crazy and they all hated each other. She said she'd still vote for them, but she'd never campaign for them again.
I think we adored Tony - to start with - because he offered a promise of freshness and change after an administration which had become stale and monstrous. He was young and energetic. And for the first few months, everything seemed to be well. And then we started to get worrying signs. Like Blunkett as Home Secretary seeming to be more right-wing than any Tory.
I have never voted Labour. Initially I voted Liberal, then Lib-Dem. Then I went through a period of voting Monster Raving Loony. These days, I vote Green.
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calcinations
User: calcinations
Date: 2008-05-05 11:04 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I've never trusted Tony Blair. I was 20 when he got into power, and long before that I couldn't stand his PR looks and actions. I didn't get particularly politically minded until I was 21, 22 or so, so I didn't dislike him because of his politics.

Nice to see someone else who has never voted labour.

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RealThog: sunset
User: realthog
Date: 2008-05-05 15:00 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:sunset

"I never knew you stood for office. Good on you. How'd you do?"

I had a 27.5% swing in my favour . . . which sounds great, except it meant I still got only a fraction of the Tory vote in the ward where I was standing. This was in 1971 or so in Quintin Hogg's old constituency: not ripe Labour territory.

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calcinations
User: calcinations
Date: 2008-05-05 11:09 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Yes, the Murdoch propaganda sheets are to blame for a lot, but there is a long history of conservative thinking working people in this country. Look at Chartism, for example.
However I fail to see how Gordon has not delivered Corporate friendly policies. I have seen no tangible sign of him actually being materially different from Blair in any way worth mentioning.

Possibly I'm so cheesed off I'm missing something, but Gordon is the kind of idiot who thinks he is doing a good job by keeping the PFI, whereby all the extra money he puts into the NHS is siphoned off into the pockets of private companies instead of helping the NHS. THis is not the actions of someone who thinks differently from Blair.

The british public, as far as I can tell, has always wanted the same thing. Nobody has told them that they are taking part in an experiment.
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RealThog
User: realthog
Date: 2008-05-05 11:56 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

"I have seen no tangible sign of him actually being materially different from Blair in any way worth mentioning."

The difference in his attitude towards Il Buce is very obvious from this side of the pond. Refreshingly so, after years of brown-nosing from Bliar. It really is a most marked change.
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calcinations
User: calcinations
Date: 2008-05-05 11:06 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
THis just makes it clear how much we need a None of the above box on the paper. A nice separate one at the bottom, which says in big letters:

"Put your cross here if you do not want to vote for any of the above candidates".
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