?

Log in

No account? Create an account
the word today is brought to you by the letter `r' - The Villages

hutch0
Date: 2008-06-07 00:44
Subject: the word today is brought to you by the letter `r'
Security: Public
Location:the utility room in the sky
Mood:calmcalm
Music:porcupine tree
From artykat I bring you memeness. Post a comment and I'll give you a letter, and you have to list five songs beginning with that letter. If you've been particularly nice to me over the past, oh, thousand years or so, I won't give you the letter `Q'.
My letter is `R,' and I offer:

`Rebel Rebel' by David Bowie (thereby getting a double letter score)
`Raised On Robbery' by Joni Mitchell (thereby getting another double letter score)
`Ripples' by Genesis
`Rubberband Girl' by Kate Bush
`Roscoe' by Midlake.

And many, many more...
Post A Comment | 22 Comments | | Link






Kat
User: artykat
Date: 2008-06-07 01:04 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
*stands and applauds* Well done!
Reply | Thread | Link



hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-06-07 23:33 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I thank you.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2008-06-08 16:45 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I'm up for the challenge, so hit me with a letter!
Reply | Thread | Link



hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-06-08 21:27 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Ah, a brave man if ever I met one. I bestow on you that most rock`n'roll of all letters, the letter `J.' Make me proud!
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2008-06-08 22:01 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
OK... *scratches head*... 'J', eh? Hmmm...

'Jesus Built My Hotrod' by Ministry
'Jericho' by The Prodigy
'Jimmy' by Tool
'Janie's Got a Gun' by Aerosmith
'Jean Genie' by David Bowie

The first three are from my own music collection.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-06-08 22:02 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Aw, that was just too easy!
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2008-06-08 22:34 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I was secretly hoping for the feared letter 'Q', and had already thought of five songs for it:

'Queer' by Garbage
'Quinn the Eskimo' by Bob Dylan
'Quality Seconds' by Orbital
'Quiet Life' by Japan
'Quick Quick Slow' by Ian Dury and the Blockheads
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-06-08 22:40 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Hm. I see you may be unbeatable...
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2008-06-08 22:55 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Nah, if you'd given me 'X' or 'Z' I'd have run crying to my mum :)

Well, I hear the siren call of the chance to shoot some frakking toasters out of the sky before I hit the sack. See my latest LJ entry to find out what the hell I'm talking about...
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-06-09 21:39 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I did see that, and I checked it out. Is it an online game where you get to play with someone in Auckland or Tierra del Fuego, or a stand-alone single-person shooter?
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2008-06-09 22:44 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
It has both a single-player campaign mode and an online multiplayer mode :-)

The single player campaign is fairly short at the moment; that part of the game is the 'work in progress'. All they really need to do is get some more missions written, some more ship models done and the voice acting to go with the missions, and they'd have a commercial quality game.

The graphics are pretty impressive, but it's the authentic sound effects and music that really draws you in. Basically, it feels like you are in an episode of BSG. Even the bantering comms chatter from the other colonial pilots sounds like the kind of thing you'd hear in the show!
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-06-09 22:57 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
If it has a single-player mode, I'm up for it. I don't tend to last very long in multiplayer games. I'll download it and give it a spin.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2008-06-10 00:04 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I'm the same, multiplayer-only games have little appeal for me. Now, when I say the single player campaign is short, I mean it is short. Like, two missions short. You do get to go head to head with the Cylon Raider known as Scar in the second mission though... remember him from season two?

The good news is, there are a bunch of third party (made by the game's community of players) stand-alone missions that can be downloaded and added on.

OK, now I feel bad for totally derailing this thread.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-06-10 22:42 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Nah, don't feel bad. It's good to chat, and nobody else seems wildly interested in this thread. Although now Thog's out of hospital he may decide to rise to the challenge.
I don't mind the single-player campaign being short. I shouldn't let myself get sidetracked from the book, anyway. I'll definitely give it a whirl. I do remember Scar.
So, how's you?
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2008-06-10 23:04 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Perhaps I should have mentioned - before rising to the musical challenge - that I used to be a D.J. (disco, not radio) once upon a time...

Aye, it'll be good to see Thog back around here. I really need to check out some of his books, but my local library doesn't have anything by him. An oversight on their part, I'm sure!

It's possible (if you're a even a half-decent Viper jockey) to complete the campaign in about 30 minutes or so, so I doubt it will interfere too much with your book. Do you have much trouble keeping the nose to the grindstone? I remember reading the authors notes of Isaac Asimov and Piers Anthony, where they both claimed to have never suffered from writer's block and that they can therefore accurately predict their writing output. Are you blessed like that?

Ahhh, and you end with my least favourite question ever! I face the dilemma of lying by saying everything is peachy, or telling the truth that nobody wants to hear. I'll compromise by (truthfully) saying that things could be much worse, and that I think the new meds may be starting to kick in. Apparently it can take a couple of months for them to achieve full effectiveness.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-06-11 23:24 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Ah, well, if you'd said you'd been a DJ I wouldn't have even have let you join in. That's a bit like letting Ronaldo play in a Sunday League match.
I'm probably not a great viper jockey; we'll see.
I have enormous trouble keeping my nose to the grindstone. I'm terminally idle, which is why the cheeleaders have been so good; I've got to finish this thing or they'll all gang up against me. Plus pds_lit is my agent and she's watching. I'm baffled at how people can predict their writing output. I see writers' blogs with little meters saying `80,000 of 150,000' or something like that, and I wonder how they can possibly know how long the book's going to be. I have a vague feeling mine's going to be around 150k. I know for certain it'll be over 100k, but beyond that I have no idea.
I'm glad things are not as bad as they might be (very gnomic) and that the meds are starting to work. I'll be keeping my fingers crossed.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2008-06-12 23:10 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
The mobile disco I DJed for (and had a one-third interest in) was a pretty small operation, and it was over twenty years ago. Borrowing your analogy, at best, I'd be a retired division three player unfit to clean Ronaldo's boots!

I'll put my hands up to the charge of being terminally idle too. Frankly, I don't know how anyone can organise their thoughts well enough to tackle a writing project of over 100k words. I'd love to write - had some oddball ideas based on some of my more interesting nightmares kicking around for a while - but there's no way I can even imagine myself focussing for the amount of time necessary to produce even a short story. Plus there's the tendency to compare anything I do manage to write to the writing of authors that I admire, and then give up in disgust.

Hmmm, I'm wondering if the mere fact that I can even have a 'glass half full' feeling means that the meds are indeed beginning to do their thing...
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-06-12 23:23 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Hey, even a retired third divison player would be wildly overqualified in this analogy.
There's no reason why you shouldn't write. Two or three k puts you comfortably into the short-story bracket, and everybody can do that. As for comparing yourself to other writers, ah, screw 'em, what do they know? I think the problem is you imagining yourself writing. Give it a whirl. Why not? How can it hurt?
Go meds!
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2008-06-12 23:42 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
All the advice I ever saw about writing included the phrase 'write what you know'. Which puts me in a bit of a pickle*, as I don't know (or understand at all) other people. Heh, most of the time I feel that I'm on Earth, but not of it. Basically, I have immense difficulty with characterisation and dialogue. Of show-stopping proportions.

The last time I wrote anything as long as a short story, I was still at school. OK, I confess that the teachers were impressed with it. They tacked me onto a different class's school trip as a reward (along with the A+ assignment grade, gold star, etc), and stuck it in the next issue of the school magazine.

Did any of that give me any more self-confidence? Of course not! I can shrug off compliments like water from a duck's back**!

* Been watching Deadwood, loving it, and enjoy stealing expressions heard on the show. Just finished season one.

** A skill I've seen you demonstrate, now that I think of it...
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-06-15 00:04 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I've seen that advice too. Kind of schmeisses you if you want to write science fiction, doesn't it? Or even an espionage novel (unless you've been an intelligence officer) Hutch's First Principle Of Writing is: write something you'd enjoy reading. And, er, that's it, really. That's all I'm doing, telling myself stories. I still don't think of them as stuff to be sold, and I'm not terribly upset if they don't sell. I suspect this is one of the (very many) differences between me and Charlie Stross. I'm an amateur, and Charlie is very definitely a professional. Charlie works very, very hard - not only with the writing but with the promo - and I admire the hell out of him for it. I suspect that in a couple of years he'll be in a position to lift his foot off the pedal a little bit, while I'll still be whining that Europe In Autumn is selling for fifty quid second-hand. Assuming we manage to sell it to someone. Assuming I ever finish the damn thing.
I suspect you and I have quite a lot in common. My first collection came out when I was still at school, and I had the gold star experience too. Not fun, is it? I was already doing the shrugging-off-compliments thing by then, but it came in mighty handy. I consider that I've been a professional writer since I was sixteen (which is when my mother bought me my first typewriter and I started submitting stuff to the mighty and much-missed Science Fiction Monthly) and it still weirds me out when someone wants to publish me.
To me, the language in Deadwood absolutely makes the show. I've had rows with various people about it, and the best explanation I ever read was that people did swear back then, but their swearwords were pretty tame to our ears. `God damn' was serious stuff, in those days. So, to reflect that, and to give us today some idea of the shocking nature of the language, the writers updated it to language which is shocking today. And I think a television series which takes that much care is something to be cherished. And the writing is just so good. And Ian McShane is marvellous.

Edited at 2008-06-15 10:42 pm (UTC)
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



rou_killingtime
User: rou_killingtime
Date: 2008-06-15 22:59 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Hmm, I'm not sure if I've ever enjoyed reading anything I've written. I'm my own harshest critic. Heh, I've read so much SF that I reckon I do know the subject reasonably well. Plus there's the fact that as a card carrying geek I have a strong interest in cutting-edge science and technology from the real world, which ought to stand me in good stead. I still don't have a handle on characterisation and dialogue though... however I'm sure I read Asimov claiming he struggled with those too, and I never noticed that from reading his stories.

I'll confess that I've not read any Charlie Stross thus far. (Hangs head in shame) I see from his page on Wikipedia that he's released some of his stuff under a creative commons license, so I'll download that and check it out.

You know, I was sure I remembered from the two collections of yours that I read all those years ago that you were still in your teens when they were published. Glad to discover my memory isn't quite as flaky as I thought it was! Totally with you on the whole gold star experience. I hated the attention, and wished I'd never written the damn thing!

On the subject of profanity in Deadwood: I'm in total agreement with you. I expect that the denizens of 'wild west' mining camps were as profane as they come, and to use authentic language from the period would indeed sound pretty tame to modern ears. I should note here that I'm not offended by swearing at all. They're just words, and have no power to harm anyone. Ever watched Entourage? There's some impressively creative swearing in that show!
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



hutch0
User: hutch0
Date: 2008-06-15 23:25 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
So you just keep writing until you do enjoy what you've written. It's like anything else; you have to practice, and you get better at it. And you'd be surprised (or maybe not) at how little character and dialogue seem to matter to some writers so long as they push their Big Idea. I've always thought there were some science fiction writers (and wild horses would not drag the names out of me) for whom the science was more important than the fiction, which to me defeats the whol object of the exercise.
Charlie's good, and he's getting better. His new book, Halting State, is very good indeed. I enjoyed that a lot. There's a fair amount of his stuff available online which should give you a taste of what he's about.
Yeah, I tend to cringe a bit when I think back to the early books. Not because of the fiction (although some of that gets a cringe as well) but because of the circus involved. I don't do attention very well, and when you're in your teens and you publish a book people pay attention to you. And of course your peers tend to rip the piss out of you when the local paper turns up and drags you out of a lesson to do an interview in the school library. That was a very weird time, and I'm not sure I came out the other side of it with my wits entirely intact.
I too don't mind swearing; I'm an enormously profane bloke. I just loved the way the makers of Deadwood have properly addressed language. The educated people of the time would have been able to quote Shakespeare or speak Latin (as was noted in Tombstone when Doc Holliday and Johnny Ringo get into a Latin-quoting contest that teeters on the edge of violence) and the makers of the show have put that into their characters' mouths, along with the obscenity. I think it's a great work of writing.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



browse
the villages
the links
December 2013
the promo