March 17th, 2009

Aye-Aye

news of the world

It's with some sadness that I learn of the demise of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, which today publishes its final print edition before moving to an entirely web-based format - the largest US paper to do so, at least so far.
Apart from being 146 years old, which isn't too shabby for a newspaper, the P-I was also the source of much information from The Islands Of Lost Feet.
Now, I have to admit that the end of the P-I's print edition won't make very much difference to me - I've only ever read it online anyway - but it's certainly symptomatic of a chill wind that's blowing through print journalism. Hearst's decision to wrap up the P-I print operation comes only a couple of weeks after the Rocky Mountain News folded, and things are by no means sunny at once-unassailable publications like the Chicago Tribune.
Things are no better on this side of the pond. Regional journalism is taking a mauling and there's a huge feeling of uncertainty even in the Nationals.
There is intense debate about the causes and possible solutions, but I'll leave the last word to P-I columnist Bill Virgin and his impassioned take on what's going on.
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